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Archive for the ‘Dot-XXX Info’ Category

Dilute, Dilute — Not Okay!

04 Mar

Must_Be_Diluted

I’m a big fan of Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soap and have spent many an extended minute reading the rabbi’s opinionated labels reminding users to “Dilute! Dilute! OK!” This is wise advice, given the concentrated nature of the liquid in question. When applied to gTLDs, however, I believe dilution is the last thing most website and trademarks owners are looking for.

Yet, because there’s bucks to be presumably made shearing the fearful — our close personal friends at ICM Registry are introducing .Porn and .Adult to further line Stuart Lawley’s pockets and inspire adult brands to dig deeper in order to park or develop more sites on more domains.

What’s the point? Surfing for “free porn” does not equal wanting to surf to .Porn, let alone spend a dime while doing so. The tube sites should love these new frontiers, but I’m not so sure consumers or creators will be served by them.

.PORN and .ADULT Join .XXX to Form Unsexy Threesome for Brand Owners

“Yesterday marked the sunrise launch of the .porn and .adult generic top-level domains (gTLDs), which join .xxx in the top-level domain name space as gTLDs targeted mainly at online purveyors of adult entertainment.  As with .xxx, the introduction of these adult-themed gTLDs presents yet another annoyance for trademark owners already fatigued by the weekly onslaught of gTLDs introduced over the past couple of years pursuant to ICANN’s expansion of the domain name space.  Also as with .xxx, brand owners have some opportunities to defensively register .adult and .porn domain names early in the life of these new gTLDs.

ICM Registry, the operator of this titillating trifecta of gTLDs, intended that trademark owners who secured “blocking” registrations of .xxx domains would receive free matching registrations for corresponding domains in the .porn and .adult. (and the forthcoming .sex) gTLDs.  However, this plan fell through, and brand owners must once again pony up registration fees.  They generally have three options prior to general availability of .porn and .adult domains…”

Read more here.

 
 

The Charity Donations That Weren’t There

14 Jan

Shocked Face

This is my shocked face, because nobody — and I mean nobody — is more surprised than I am to learn that those vague but much ballyhooed $10 contributions to IFFOR, (The International Foundation for Online Responsibility) were more vapor than paper.

It can’t be because nobody really wants a .xxx domain, although many have fearfully parked them, and a few have actually launched a site on one. That would only land money in the pockets of ICM Registry, after all, and not promote the good that it so sincerely hopes to spread throughout the otherwise corrupt adult internet, right? What would lead us to believe such a Randian motivation could exist within such an otherwise exemplary organization?

– Darklady

The First Director of .IFFOR, Set Up By .XXX Registry; Clyde Beattie Resigns & The Money Went?

Clyde Beattie, who was one of the founders of the non-profit company set up by ICM the operator of the .XXX extension, IFFOR, (The International Foundation for Online Responsibility) which was set up as “a not-for-profit organization dedicated to developing policies for Top Level Domains that maximize benefit to global Internet users, domain holders and domain registry operators.”   has left the association as of December 31, 2014.

When .XXX was approved by ICANN, $10 of every active (but not registered domain) was promised to go to the non-profit organization IFFOR to do charitable work.

Some thought (including me) that IFFOR would get $10 in addition to the $50 wholesale registration price of every .XXX domain registration

However someone, ok me again figured out that this was not the case, as you can read here, and here.

Read more at The Domains.

 
 

85% of Registered .XXX Domains Lead Nowhere

10 Jul

    Antigonish

by William Hughes Mearns

“Yesterday, upon the stair,
I met a man who wasn’t there
He wasn’t there again today
I wish, I wish he’d go away…”

I’m not a math whiz, but when 85% of your registered domains don’t go anywhere, it’s hard not to think that either a lot of people are having a super hard time finding a webmaster or they only registered their .xxx domains in order to protect their brands.

Either way, it’s money in ICM Registry and Stuart Lawley’s pockets, so they sure aren’t shedding any tears over the uninhabited real estate. It’s not like they exist for the benefit of the adult entertainment industry or its fan base, after all.

IFFOR Publishes Two Years Of Tax Returns Showing 85% Of .XXX Domains Don’t Resolve

The International Foundation for Online Responsibility (IFFOR) a not-for-profit organization which was set up as part of ICM application to operate the .XXX registry has now published on its site, its tax returns for 2011 and 2012.

In 2012 IFFOR had income of $267,740.

“This income is derived entirely from the $10 per resolving domain commitment that ICM Registry has made to fund IFFOR.”

“The increase of $58,880 in 2012 is due to an increase in the number of resolving dot-xxx domain names.”

In 2011 IFFOR had an income of $208,860.

“This income is derived entirely from the $10 per resolving domain commitment that ICM Registry has made to fund IFFOR.”

Read more here.

 

Will Porn Owe Its Soul to the Company Store?

15 Apr

    Sixteen Tons

“…You load sixteen tons, what do you get
Another day older and deeper in debt
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’t go
I owe my soul to the company store…”

It’s not like we didn’t see this coming, but what the hell. Besides, all your .xxx belong to ICM Registry.

– Darklady

.XXX Paid Search Engine Is Now Live

We just got an email from the ICM Registry that the .XXX paid Search Engine is now Live.

Search.XXX is a search engine for just sites using a .XXX domains and launched in September of 2012.

We told you back in February that .XXX had given each registrant of a .XXX domain name a credit which they could use to buy ads on the .XXX Search Engine when it went live.

Read more here.

 
 

Happy Birthday, .XXX — Too Bad Nobody Likes You

14 Dec

Ideally, a birth is a joyful event worth celebrating; whether it be the birth of a living creature or an idea.

The tragic reality is that many births are less than enthusiastically welcomed.

The December 6, 2011 birth of .XXX is a sad case in point.

Other than ICM Registry, who is genuinely excited — in a positive way — about the fact that .XXX is now available for sale to the general public?

Ouch.

This kid is going to grow up strange, assuming it lives long enough to grow up at all.

– Darklady

Opinion: XXX domains an obvious failure

(Mashable) – Is it just me or is the ICANN plan to corral online porn going terribly wrong? We already have reports that universities are snapping up XXX domains in an effort to get ahead of porn pranksters who want to besmirch a few good online names with smut.

I guess this turn of events was obvious to anyone with half a brain…

Read more here.

.XXX: The Hottest-Selling Unwanted Domains on the Web

Companies that have no interest whatsoever in Internet porn are lining up to purchase .xxx domains to protect their brands in what may be shaping up to be a debacle for ICANN. The group Morality in Media has even appealed to Congress to pass legislation that would give companies a say over the use of their names in the adult entertainment domain without having to buy protection…

Read more here.

ICM Registry / Go Daddy – .XXX – Denied My Trademark!

Today I received this from Go Daddy:

We are contacting you regarding your application for the domain name: DNFORUM.XXX

Unfortunately, we have been informed that your application has been determined to be invalid. Please be aware that the application fee is non-refundable…

Read more here.

Morality in Media Wants Congress To Make It A Crime To Register A .XXX Domain Matching Any Domain In Any Extension

Morality in Media (MIM) has called for Congress to make it a crime for anyone to register a domain name on the .xxx site that is registered on another domain without the consent of the owner of the other domain name.

In a statement, MIM President Patrick Trueman said, “Nearly every company in the world, every blogger, and the holders of any domain name must fear that the ICM Registry will allow their good name to be trashed on the .XXX domain unless they pay this ‘protection money’ to ICM Registry and its affiliated registrars.”

Read more here.

Morality in Media Calls for Federal Investigation of ICM Registry and All Involved in XXX Domain

News that the .XXX Domain is going live today caused Morality in Media to call for an investigation of ICM Registry, the company behind the .XXX Domain, for possible violations of federal laws prohibiting distribution of hard-core obscene Internet pornography.

Read more here.

 
 

Welcome To Dot-XXX Opposition

22 Nov

Upon first blush, a .xxx sTLD sounds like a brilliant idea.

But once one factors in the real world implications of such an easily blocked, censored, marginalized, and manipulated domain suffix, it becomes far less appealing.

When a business with no ties to the online adult entertainment industry decides to “protect” it by cornering the market, aggressively pushing for the domain, rewriting history, treating our representatives and press with marginal respect, brushing our concerns aside, charging $60 per registration — and telling us we’re lucky that the price is that low — even beer goggles don’t make it look kissable.

For these and other reasons, we believe that, in spite of panicked domain preregistrations, the voice of the industry is soundly raised in opposition to what would ultimately become Stuart Lawley and the ICM Registry’s company store.

The purpose of this website is to give “the other side” a soapbox upon which to stand while making its voice heard.

– Darklady

 
 

Freshly Hired, Freshly Fired: the .XXX Body Count Begins

03 Jun

It seems like it was only the beginning of May when ICM Registry proudly announced the hiring of industry veterans Chris Lebrun and Pete Housley as its sales team.

That’s because it was.

It seems like it wasn’t even the end of May when ICM Registry and Lebrun split the sheets and went their separate ways.

That’s because it wasn’t.

If industry scuttlebutt on GFY or the XBiz are any indication, the first move didn’t earn Lebrun any new friends and the second move didn’t redeem him. Other than saying he is satisfied with “the terms” of his separation and wishes ICM Registry “the best of luck,” he hasn’t had much to say publicly about the matter.

Perhaps this is reflective of the “no committment (sic) and 100% confidential” Founders Program policy he ever-so-briefly tried to sell the online adult world on.

How things are going with the company’s other new hires, including the kind-of-surprising-but-not-really-given-her-recent-behavior April hire of Joan Irvine (formerly CEO of the Association of Sites Advocating Child Protection) as the first executive director of IFFOR.

Irvine’s new job title is already earning her negative reviews from long-time members of the industry… and it will be interesting to see if ASACP becomes the promised recipient of a percentage of .XXX registration fees, as per ICM Registry’s promise to “protect children.”

Of course, it will also be interesting (at least to me) to see how my continued updating and opining on this site will affect consideration of my application as a free speech advocate for IFFOR. It’s true, I sent one in. Might as well venture into the belly of the beast and find out what’s really going on… assuming the beast has the stomach for such a thing.

– Darklady

 
 

.XXX Pre-Registration: The Shakedown Begins

17 May

It has begun — and who, except for everyone, anticipated that it would begin like this?

And by “this,” I naturally mean with a feverish money grab into the pockets of anyone and everyone with a trademark to defend.

Talk about making decisions with a financial gun to our head! Whether you don’t want a .XXX domain because you own the “Happiest Place on Earth” or urge others to “Just Do It, or you think the idea of a .XXX sTLD is a bad one in general or just don’t want/can’t afford to pay the insane registration prices that are being bandied about — all you have to do is pay $300 – $650 per URL to make sure no one else gets to register a website with your name on it.

Seems fair, right? $300+ for… nothing. That’s got to feel extra good to the mainstream company with multiple trademarks that have nothing to do with porn. Way to improve the reputation of the adult entertainment industry, registrars.

At least it’s a one-time fee, unlike the annual renewal costs you can expect if you buy into the .XXX mythos. Depending on which of the 60 provisionally approved registrars you use (check out the links below and/or in the sidebar for more details), you could be paying anywhere between $75 and $100 per domain. Some registrars are offering bulk discounts, which seems weird given that Stuart Lawley assured the forum audience on XBiz.net that there would be no bulk prices, no discounts for non-profits, no special deals.

Ah, well. It’s the worst recession in the history of the United States. Perhaps these kind technical benefactors have relented and decided to grace their more well-heeled flock with a few vaguely noticeable bargains, after all.

Mensches, every man jack of them.

– Darklady

Dot-xxx Price Wars Begin

YNOT – On Friday, a second domain registrar revealed tentative pricing for dot-xxx domains. According to a report at DomainIncite.com, U.K.-based registrar DomainMonster will offer the adults-only domains at prices ranging from U.S. $75 to $300.

The $75 price point (actually $74.99) represents a discount off the standard price of $99.99 when an entity registers more than 25 domains at a time during the “open season” registration period, which will follow the Sunrise and Landrush phases. When entities register between 10 and 25 domains at a time, DomainMonster plans drop the price to $89.99 each, Chief Executive Officer Matt Mansell told DomainIncite.

During the Sunrise phase, meant to give trademark holders an opportunity to protect their intellectual property, dot-xxx domains may be blocked for $299.99, $289.99 or $249.99 apiece, using the same volume-based sliding scale.

For owners of non-trademarked domains in other domain spaces who wish to “grandfather” their domains in dot-xxx during Sunrise, volume-based prices will run $199.99, $179.99 and $149.99, respectively. The grandfather prices also will apply to the Landrush phase…

To read more, visit: Dot-xxx Price Wars Begin

More Links: Read ‘em and weep:

Protecting Trademarks in the New .XXX Domain Name Release

$300 to block your trademark from ‘.xxx’ – but that’s the tip of the iceberg

Up to $650 for a .xxx domain – or to keep your name off one

Trademark Owners .XXX Opt-out Fee Hovers at $300

.XXX Domain Pricing From $75

Domainmonster.com to Charge $75 and Up for .XXX Domains

 
 

IANA Adds .XXX to Root Nameservers

17 Apr

IANA Adds .XXX to Root Nameservers

CYBERSPACE—The question whether or not the U.S. Commerce Department would prevent the addition of .XXX to the root has been answered. The top-level domain is now live. IANA, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, added the sTLD to the root nameservers early Friday.

Several second level domains, including sex.xxx, xxx.xxx and porn.xxx go to landing page for ICM Registry, which operates the top-level domain. The pages contain links to the ICM website.

Greg Dumas of ICM Registry said, “We are pleased to bring .XXX into the adult marketplace and the positive response since approval has been overwhelming. This is definitely an exciting time.”

For more on this subject, visit: XXX domain names go live

 
 

Will .XXX be the Loneliest sTLD on the Interwebs?

04 Apr

There’s something especially sad and ironic about an sTLD dedicated to sex that doesn’t seem to have a friend in the world.

Given that even though .XXX wants us to make a financially risky and high cost commitment to it — but doesn’t really know how it feels about us (or how much it plans to charge us so it can make up its mind), it shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone, least of all ICM Registry.

I’ve only been to the Phoenix Forum once, but it was one of the best adult online industry conferences that I’ve ever attended. While I’m glad that ICM Registry sent someone to speak with the professionals assembled, I’m disappointed — and more than a little tired of yet more non-answers.

After so many years, you’d think the company would have figured out what it will charge and what it will offer in return.

You’d think.

– Darklady

Nobody wants the new .XXX sex domain

Over the last few years we’ve seen various attempts by governments to censor and control the Internet. China has sort to stop criticism of its policies and to suppress the views of dissidents by controlling internet information at its cyber borders and employing large numbers of people to spy on its citizens’ internet activity. Australia has set up a regulatory scheme which includes a black list of sites that are either X rated or Refused Classification.

There are other ways that governments use to censor the internet including the provision of extreme penalties for viewing certain types of material. In Iran for example, you can be executed for getting around government filters and under some circumstances, just watching porn.

However all these attempts to censor the internet tend to come from governments – and occasionally morals groups who push governments. Censorship of the internet hardly ever comes from the internet industry itself, for obvious reasons. Last week that all changed. In what must rank as one of the most stupid and transparently self-serving decisions on the internet thus far, the international organisation charged with creating and regulating internet domain names, the International Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), approved a new .XXX domain (TLD) for adult and sexually explicit sites.

To read more, visit: ABC

For a prime example of how unpopular .XXX is, read: .XXX Comes Under Fire at The Phoenix Forum

Check out another IT publication that realizes adult professionals don’t like .XXX: Impenetrable Processes and Fool’s Gold at ICANN

 
 

Cats & Dogs Living Together without Benefit of Marriage!

02 Apr

Things have been so serious lately that I figured it was time for a bit of levity… if you can call this kind of close-minded, sex-negative, demagogic hand waving and hysteria encouraging bigotry amusing.

My favorite line from this article is definitely “Everyone who consumes pornography is immersed in an artificial world that distorts reality and relationships.”

Talk about projection! This from someone who thinks the one-and-only natural place for all sexual behavior is within a heterosexual marriage. Possibly without benefit of birth control — and most likely in the dark under the blankets. I doubt masturbation gets a hall-pass even then.

Why, O why, were our arms made long enough for us to touch our genitals?

On the other hand (so to speak), if there’s a deviant sex scandal to be enjoyed from a distance, the religious right certainly seems proficient at serving it up. Men’s bathrooms foot tapping signals, transsexual Craigslist dating, divorce papers served in the cancer ward, Wisconsin mistresses, NRCC strip club visits, “hiking the Appalachia trail,” under-age panda bear suit yiffing, hot chatting Congressional pages, RentBoys “carrying luggage,” gay murder/suicides, solo rubber bondage deaths… liberals just can’t keep up!

Oh, and then there’s that pesky fact that “Red” states consume far more pornography than “Blue” states.

No wonder the religious right is so upset about .XXX. It’ll be much more difficult to explain away a computer history filled with websites sporting that sTLD.

– Darklady

“.XXX” – The Internet’s New Red Light District

(WNS) — It’s not likely you’ve heard of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), but this international organization in charge of Internet addresses has just approved a policy that will create what amounts to a red-light district online.

We’re all familiar with the top level domains like “.com”, “.edu” and “.org.” Now, after years of debate, ICANN has approved “.xxx” for porn websites.

So now, for the first time, a specific industry will have its own suffix on the Internet. In this case, it happens to be an industry that exploits women and ensnares thousands of men and even children into a harmful addiction that can ruin lives and relationships.

For starters, the new .xxx domain will significantly increase the amount of porn online since adult websites will not have to give up their current web addresses. Instead, they’ll create new websites with the new suffix, making their content more prevalent and accessible.

Ironically, family groups and the porn industry were united in their opposition to the change. Pornographers didn’t like it because of the additional costs of the domain and the chance that some countries will block the .xxx domain altogether. India has already announced that they will do so.

Those of us concerned about pornography’s impact on individuals and families are troubled because it will further spread the amount of harmful content that is already so pervasive online. Porn isn’t hard to find online, or to unwittingly stumble across, but ICANN is expanding the territory exponentially.

To read more, visit: Cross Walk

To read a less histrionic article, read: ICANN Signs .XXX Contract with ICM Registry

 
 

The Pointlessness of Specialized TLDs

01 Apr

I can’t think of anything snarky to say here, because this article manages to make so many good points in so few words.

Read it through and then check out some of the comments on the original site. As is so often the case, some feed into all the reasons .XXX is a poor idea — but there are some good points and, well, some nice preaching to the choir moments, too.

– Darklady

India’s Plan To Block .xxx Shows The Pointlessness Of Specialized TLDs

from the open-the-whole-thing-up dept

For many years, we’ve wondered about the wisdom of ICANN slowly doling out totally pointless new top level domains (TLDs) — like .jobs and .mobi — that seemed much more focused on getting companies to pay up for domains they didn’t need, rather than serving any useful purpose. With the recent approval of .xxx, the same thing is happening. Various porn companies feel the need to buy up .xxx domain names, even though they already have domains they’re happy with. And making things even worse is that various countries, with India taking the lead, have declared plans to block all access to the .xxx domain anyway.

Of course, this is kind of silly. It’s as if they’re pretending that porn doesn’t exist elsewhere on the web. But, the other silly thing this highlights is the idea of slowly rolling out specialized TLDs. For years, we’ve been asking why ICANN doesn’t just do away with specialized TLDs and let anyone register anything.anyTLD. It really would not be that difficult to set up a system to allow that, and then you get away from this idea of having to set up all these expensive special TLDs. It also makes it silly for any country to target a specific TLD to block. But, of course, it won’t happen, because it doesn’t involve the companies wishing to be registrars of these new TLDs getting tons of cash.

To read comments on this article, visit: Tech Dirt

Other new link(s): Dot-XXX? Hooray, I suppose

XXX domain officially banned in India

 
 

XXX domain poses headache for Indian regulators

30 Mar

I’m having trouble feeling much sympathy for India since I’m not a big fan of censorship.

Given that the country is full of highly intelligent, well-educated IT professionals with a keen interest in sex and little opportunity to have that satisfied with good information at home, blocking (and overcoming the block of) this sTLD should be endless fun for all involved.

– Darklady

XXX domain poses headache for Indian regulators

India is proposing to block .xxx-registered websites after a global agency governing the web approved the suffix for pornography websites last week, risking confrontation between a fast-liberalising youth and strong traditionalist values.

The government’s move followed a decade-long dialogue within the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) that resulted in the approval for .xxx suffix for pornography websites. Sales of .xxx domains should begin soon in Q2 2011.

Taking a cue from .com, .org, .nic and others, the creation of .xxx would identify adult content and services and could be used by governments for mass censorship of adult content.

Despite continuous efforts by some staunch conservative groups, porn remains easily accessible in India. The move to ban savitabhabhi.com, a popular toon porn site, fell flat when it later resurfaced through a foreign server.

In addition to labelling it immoral under the Indian Penal Code, distribution of adult content is illegal. Distributing such content in the electronic form calls for imprisonment for a maximum term of five years or/and fine which may extend to 100,000 rupees ($2,237)…

To read more, visit: Reuters India

Today’s other new link(s): Gamma Pledges Ongoing Donations to Anti-.XXX Campaign

 
 

Will the .xxx Domain Name Kill the Online Porn Industry?

29 Mar

Well, that’s an encouraging mainstream headline, isn’t it?

Once again, with friends like ICM Registry, who needs enemies?

Please note that this author has used the term “virtual ghetto.” Stuart Lawley has insisted that there is no way that this sTLD could ever be a “virtual ghetto.” No, no, no… it’s a “resort,” kinda like prison is a resort, I guess… in as much as it’s filled with people who are out of sight and therefore easy to ignore. And secure against unauthorized dangers.

Yeah, right.

Of course, this sTLD can only kill the industry if everyone goes bankrupt paying out the nose to protect their brands by parking their .XXX domains… or we’re all forced into it by a governmental mandate. And that could never happen, right?

– Darklady

Will the .xxx Domain Name Kill the Online Porn Industry?

Earlier this month, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) approved a new Internet domain suffix. After a meeting in San Francisco, the group released a draft agreement that .xxx would soon become a Top Level Domain (similar to .com, .org and .edu) for the world’s adult websites.

The group, which stands to make millions of dollars from the decision as all new .xxx domain names will have to be registered through the Florida-based ICM Registry at $60 each, has been debating the .xxx domain for at least seven years now. (The group has already registered about 250,000 domain names in anticipation of ICANN’s decision.)

Ironically, anti-porn and religious groups, according to PCWorld, have been the most vocal opponents of the new suffix. “Anti-pornography groups and religious groups are against the suffix because they feel it will make porn sites more visible and be an endorsement to the adult entertainment industry,” Sarah Jacobsson Purewal explained. But once the initial media fervor surrounding the creation of a new domain suffix dies down, it could do just the opposite. Creating a virtual ghetto for pornography will make it significantly easier for parents, employers and entire legislative bodies to police unwanted content.

To read more, visit: The Atlantic

 
 

Sorry, .XXX, but Nobody Really Likes You

29 Mar

Poor .XXX.

Nobody seems to like it except for ICM Registry and Stuart Lawley.

The question now seems to be whether to just ignore the bully sTLD — or give in to its demands to pay protection money to defend what may or may not be established adult (or not) brands from poachers.

And exactly how much will that protection money be? I read numbers ranging from $60 to $75 per registration with absolutely no explanation as to why that’s a wise investment or how the money is going to be spent.

Mooning the Porn Stars

Steve DelBianco did a great job of discussing the rocky relationship between ICANN’s Government Advisory Committee (GAC) and the Board of Directors, in his piece entitled “.XXX Exposes the Naked Truth for ICANN”.

I’ve been keeping an eye on the adult industry press to see what their reaction is to the .XXX debacle.

But before we start, let’s get something out of the way. Yes, the adult industry is the people who bring us distended boobies and bums. Shall we all get our giggles out now? Because, part of what motivated the .XXX proposal was a dismissive attitude of ‘they are just porn stars, sleaze merchants, so they probably won’t put much up of a fight over a bald-faced tax’. If one assumes the people working in the industry are as smart as the bimbos and studs portrayed on film, one would be sadly mistaken.

An adult industry organization, the Free Speech Coalition organized a lightly-attended protest at the ICANN meeting in a last-ditch effort to deter the .XXX initiative. I’m told that there were more smokers in front of the conference hotel than there were adult industry protesters, that may speak to the poor life-style choices of ICANN attendees more than it does to adult industry passion (feigned or otherwise) for the issue, I don’t know.

One thing was made eminently clear at this point, unlike .aero .museum or any of the other sTLDS that have attained complete and utter failure, the underlying industry did not support the proposal.

To read more, visit: CircleID

Two more interesting and related links to check out:
XXX Does Not Mark the Spot

Sorry, You Can’t Boycott a Top Level Domain Name

 

FSC Launches Anti-.XXX Campaign: .XXX, A Bad Investment — Just Say NO!

27 Mar

FOR IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION
March 25, 2011
Contact: Diane Duke

FSC Launches Anti-.XXX Campaign: .XXX, A Bad Investment — Just Say NO!

CANOGA PARK, Calif. — Free Speech Coalition (FSC) announced today that it is launching an anti – .XXX campaign and urges adult online businesses to not buy into the newly-approved .XXX sTLD.

“Collectively, adult businesses understand that .ICM’s .XXX is bad for the adult entertainment industry. FSC is launching this campaign thus continuing its effort to rid the industry of this hazard. We are encouraging adult businesses to Just Say ‘NO’ to .XXX,” FSC Executive Director Diane Duke said.

“But FSC acknowledges and respects that, when push comes to shove, businesses need to do what they think is best for their company,” Duke added. “That is why adult companies need to know the implications of purchasing .XXX domain names and why buying .XXX could be the worst investment they’ll ever make.”

To help explain the potential pitfalls of the new .XXX sTLD, FSC has developed a list of bullet points highlighting some of the most serious issues for adult online businesses, and why they should avoid .XXX altogether:

• .XXX costs at least 10 times what your .coms cost (recent numbers thrown out are $70-$75/per domain name).

• Just 5 days after .XXX passed, India blocked .XXX with the promise of more countries like Australia, Germany to follow — instantly de-valuing your costly .XXX domain names.

• sTLDs have a proven history of failure — even ones that are not blocked by entire countries and have their industry’s support ( .Travel anyone???).

• High traffic websites will be leery of linking to your site, fearful of themselves being blocked or having dead links in blocking countries.

• All registrants of .XXX must agree to third-party automated monitoring of their sites for compliance of IFFOR policies — AND you will have to purchase your domain name before you even know what those policies are.

• Aliases (.XXX and .com going to the same site) require that related .coms adhere to IFFOR policies.

• IFFOR Policies will be determined by a council hand-picked by a Board chaired by ICM’s CEO Stuart Lawley-NOT the industry .XXX is supposed to represent. Moreover, ICM Registry has ultimate veto power over policy development.

• Businesses who register with .XXX make their alias .coms an easier target for censorship and blocking — do you really want to put your .coms at risk?

• Do the math — it doesn’t add up. Even if ICM’s claims of new consumers who “trust” .XXX ring true, for a company like Kink.com, which as approximately 10,000 domain names, it would have to bring in three quarters of a million dollars in new revenues annually — JUST TO BREAK EVEN!

Regulatory organization ICANN approved ICM Registry’s application for the .XXX domain last Friday, despite protests from its own Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC), the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, and strong opposition from leading adult industry businesses.

FSC will continue to keep its members updated on this important issue. As the adult industry trade association, FSC will continue to support the better business interests of all adult businesses, and will lead the opposition to .XXX domains because we believe that buying into the .XXX online ghetto is harmful to the adult industry and for individual adult business. The .XXX domain will serve only to fragment the Internet, make adult online businesses an easy target for anti-adult filtering and censorship, and also make it easier for under-age users to access adult material online.

For more information on how you can participate in and support FSC’s opposition to .XXX, contact (818) 348-9373 or diane@freespeechcoalition.com.

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The Free Speech Coalition is the national trade organization to the adult entertainment industry. Its mission is to lead, protect and support the growth and well-being of the adult entertainment community.

 

India Vows to Block .XXX — That “Resort” is Getting Pretty Exclusive

24 Mar

Well, good golly. Who saw this coming?

Adult webmasters: I’ll keep you up to date on the nations where your .XXX domains will NOT be making an appearance.

– Darklady

India’s Reaction To .xxx Domain Exhibits Why Porn Industry Hates It

What once was a brand for the porn industry seems to be its enemy in the Internet Age.

According to the Economic Times today, the government of India plans to block all .xxx domain sites once they begin to be deployed. Last week the board of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers approved the new top-level domain for pornography sites.

Like many parents around the world, India wants to stop that suitor at the door:

“India along with many other countries from the Middle East and Indonesia opposed the grant of the domain in the first place, and we would proceed to block the whole domain, as it goes against the IT Act and Indian laws,” said a senior official at the ministry of IT.

To read more, visit: Forbes

 
 

Australia Won’t See .XXX — Some “Resort,” Huh?

23 Mar

One of the most inane things that ICM Registry spokesmillionaire Stuart Lawley has claimed about .XXX is that it will be a “resort” for the adult industry. If he means that hardly anyone outside of the adult industry will spend any time there, he may be right.

As the Free Speech Coalition and many of its members have pointed out, the .XXX puts a huge target on the adult industry, making it easy to block an entire nation from the sTLD’s content (unless, of course, one uses the IP string to locate a site, but that’s another topic…).

This isn’t a hysterical or unreasonable concern… especially since it’s not just the countries one would expect to support censorship of this kind that are considering a lock-down on the sTLD.
Australia, for instance, is developing quite the reputation for suppressing erotic expression. It’s not at all happy about ICANN’s decision to ignore copious opposition and authorize .XXX.

Feds still concerned about .XXX domain

…The Australian Government was among those opposing .XXX. Last October, Communications Minister Stephen Conroy told ICANN that there was a “lack of identified public benefit” from the TLD.

A spokesman for the Minister told iTnews today that the Government planned to “continue to work with ICANN to ensure the internet operates in the public benefit”.

Although ICANN claimed that more than 50 percent of the feedback it had received between August and October was in favour of proceeding with the .XXX agreement, Conroy’s spokesman said 89 percent of respondents to a March 2010 consultation opposed .XXX.

“There is significant opposition to .XXX from the general public and key stakeholders,” she said. “Representatives from family groups and the adult industry have strongly opposed .XXX…”

Fortunately, there’s a rebel political party trying to bring common sense back into fashion in Australia. Vote Australian Sex Party!

Aussie Sex Party Says .XXX Represents Censorship

MELBOURNE — Australia Sex Party President Fiona Patten said the new .XXX domain marks the beginning of the end for ICANN and its system of apportioning domain names and numbers.

“How on Earth can they approve a TLD that does not have the support of the relevant industry or GAC [Government Advisory Committee]?” Patten asked.

Patten said the Australian government and the country’s adult industry have been opposed to .XXX since its inception albeit for different reasons.

“Not only have they have ignored advice from us but they have ignored the advice of its own GAC, which included the Australian government,” she said…

 
 
 
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